Monday, September 4, 2017

Sound & Groove, Episode 72: "Songs Of The Celestial" Part 2



Oklahoma guitar hero J.J. Cale had a long career as a session man and recording engineer before launching a low-key but cult-like followed solo career in his early 30s. A master at melding bluegrass, country, blues and folk into a murky, swampy, unique presentation that became part of the "Tulsa Sound," Cale had many of his signature tracks covered by high-profile names such as Lynyrd Skynyrd ("Call Me The Breeze"), Captain Beefheart ("Same Old Blues") and Eric Clapton ("After Midnight," "Cocaine," several others)- the one who extolled Cale's virtues like no other, crediting him with a change in his approach in the mid-70s and even collaborating with him on an album in 2006. Cale continued to make interesting work up until his 2013 death and is featured on this 2nd podcast of 2017 for S&G.


This here is the 2nd official episode of 2017 for the Sound & Groove Podcast but of course it's way overdue. Don't fret though. Another 4 will still follow here in the rest of 2017. This particular edition is the second of a 2-episode theme with songs of the celestial- ie dealing with or alluding to outer space and all the various orbital/flying objects found in it. How fitting considering the recent solar eclipse to cross the planet.


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centered around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I played edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, each month will contain a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple

Track Listing:
1. Cajun Moon- J.J. Cale (1974)
2. Sun It Rises- Fleet Foxes (2008)
3. A Handful Of Stars/Stars Fell On Alabama- Mel Torme & Rob McConnell (1987)
4. Concerning The UFO Sighting Near Highland, Illinois- Sufjan Stevens (2005)
5. Satellite- Elvis Costello (1989)
6. Walking On The Moon- The Police (1979)
7. Planet Rock- Afrika Bambaataa & Soul Sonic Force (1982)
8. The Space Invader- The Pretenders (1980)


Info of note:
Intro- "Just Like A Woman" by Nina Simone (1971)
Outro- "My Baby Just Cares For Me" by Nina Simone (1958)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Friday, August 4, 2017

Sound & Groove, Episode 71: "Songs of the Celestial" Part 1


Between 1969 and 1972, English folk musician Nick Drake only issued three, low-key, mainly acoustically performed albums on the UK label Island Records. He was 20 when the 1st (Five Leaves Left) was recorded and just 23 when the final one (Pink Moon, a followup to the middle companion, 1971's Bryter Later) was issued. However in subsequent years, more popular artists championed his unique, jazz-inflected but folk-based music and critics began to come around to praising an artist that had gone virtually unnoticed in his brief recording career- one marred by poor promotion, a reluctance to perform live and constant battles with depression that eventually led to him fading from the spotlight, albeit a dim one, after 1972. Drake never returned to his music, as a prescription drug overdose in 1974 ended his life (labeled suicide by the coroner and several others, though that verdict has been disputed ever since). Another piece of proof that unknowns in their era may come to prominence as a celebrated cult artist years later, Drake is included among the 8 songs including on this particular S&G Podcast episode.


This here is the 1st official episode of 2017 for the Sound & Groove Podcast but of course it's way overdue. Don't fret though. Another 5 will still follow here in the rest of 2017. This particular edition is the first of a 2-episode theme with songs of the celestial- ie dealing with or alluding to outer space and all the various orbital/flying objects found in it. 


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centered around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I played edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, each month will containe a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!

https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/cedandelivery85/episodes/2017-08-04T07_32_56-07_00

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple

Track Listing:
1. What A Little Moonlight Can Do- Billie Holiday (1935)
2. Saturday Sun- Nick Drake (1969)
3. Galaxy- War (1977)
4. Stella By Starlight- Tony Bennett (1962)
5. Spaceship- Kanye West (2004)
6. Yellow Moon- Neville Brothers (1989)
7. Planet Telex- Radiohead (1995)
8. Unfunky UFO- Parliament (1975) 

Info of note:
Intro- "Fire And Brimstone" by The Neville Brothers (1989)
Outro- "Brother Jake" by The Neville Brothers (1990)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Sound & Groove, Episode 70: "Delivered By The Mail"


Scottish-born twins, the Proclaimers, who emerged in the late 80s with their strikingly similar looks & vocals- unique in that they maintained their thick Scottish brogue instead of opting to Anglicize or even Americanize their singing voices. One of their signature tunes from their early days in the limelight is featured on this S&G Podcast episode- officially the last of 2016, though finally released here in June 2017. 


This here is the 6th episode of 2016 for the Sound & Groove Podcast but of course it's way overdue. Finally back from sabbatical, S&G is finally bestowing that final one from a year ago on you. Just happens to come about 6 months too late! :D Don't fret though. Another 6 will still follow here in the rest of 2017. This particular edition is a stand-alone theme just for this episode and it's songs that centre on the postal service side of things, ie sending off a letter, delivering a message, shipping a package. You catch my drift? 


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centered around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I played edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, each month will containe a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple

podcast/id52303295

Podcast link: https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/cedandelivery85/episodes/2017-06-13T20_58_01-07_00


Track Listing:
1. Please Mister Postman- The Beatles (1963)
2. Letter From America- The Proclaimers (1987)
3. Signed, Sealed, Delivered (I'm Yours)- Stevie Wonder (1970)
4. Write You A Letter- Ray LaMontagne (2002)
5. Return To Sender- Elvis Presley (1962)
6. Pretty Paper- Willie Nelson (1994 version)
7. Put The Message In The Box- World Party (1990)
8. Tear-Stained Letter- Richard Thompson (1983) 

Info of note:
Intro- "Kiko And The Lavender Moon" by Los Lobos (1992)
Outro- "Pistola Y El Corazon" by Los Lobos (1988)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!