Friday, August 4, 2017

Sound & Groove, Episode 71: "Songs of the Celestial" Part 1


Between 1969 and 1972, English folk musician Nick Drake only issued three, low-key, mainly acoustically performed albums on the UK label Island Records. He was 20 when the 1st (Five Leaves Left) was recorded and just 23 when the final one (Pink Moon, a followup to the middle companion, 1971's Bryter Later) was issued. However in subsequent years, more popular artists championed his unique, jazz-inflected but folk-based music and critics began to come around to praising an artist that had gone virtually unnoticed in his brief recording career- one marred by poor promotion, a reluctance to perform live and constant battles with depression that eventually led to him fading from the spotlight, albeit a dim one, after 1972. Drake never returned to his music, as a prescription drug overdose in 1974 ended his life (labeled suicide by the coroner and several others, though that verdict has been disputed ever since). Another piece of proof that unknowns in their era may come to prominence as a celebrated cult artist years later, Drake is included among the 8 songs including on this particular S&G Podcast episode.


This here is the 1st official episode of 2017 for the Sound & Groove Podcast but of course it's way overdue. Don't fret though. Another 5 will still follow here in the rest of 2017. This particular edition is the first of a 2-episode theme with songs of the celestial- ie dealing with or alluding to outer space and all the various orbital/flying objects found in it. 


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centered around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I played edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, each month will containe a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!

https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/cedandelivery85/episodes/2017-08-04T07_32_56-07_00

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple

Track Listing:
1. What A Little Moonlight Can Do- Billie Holiday (1935)
2. Saturday Sun- Nick Drake (1969)
3. Galaxy- War (1977)
4. Stella By Starlight- Tony Bennett (1962)
5. Spaceship- Kanye West (2004)
6. Yellow Moon- Neville Brothers (1989)
7. Planet Telex- Radiohead (1995)
8. Unfunky UFO- Parliament (1975) 

Info of note:
Intro- "Fire And Brimstone" by The Neville Brothers (1989)
Outro- "Brother Jake" by The Neville Brothers (1990)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Sound & Groove, Episode 70: "Delivered By The Mail"


Scottish-born twins, the Proclaimers, who emerged in the late 80s with their strikingly similar looks & vocals- unique in that they maintained their thick Scottish brogue instead of opting to Anglicize or even Americanize their singing voices. One of their signature tunes from their early days in the limelight is featured on this S&G Podcast episode- officially the last of 2016, though finally released here in June 2017. 


This here is the 6th episode of 2016 for the Sound & Groove Podcast but of course it's way overdue. Finally back from sabbatical, S&G is finally bestowing that final one from a year ago on you. Just happens to come about 6 months too late! :D Don't fret though. Another 6 will still follow here in the rest of 2017. This particular edition is a stand-alone theme just for this episode and it's songs that centre on the postal service side of things, ie sending off a letter, delivering a message, shipping a package. You catch my drift? 


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centered around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I played edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, each month will containe a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple

podcast/id52303295

Podcast link: https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/cedandelivery85/episodes/2017-06-13T20_58_01-07_00


Track Listing:
1. Please Mister Postman- The Beatles (1963)
2. Letter From America- The Proclaimers (1987)
3. Signed, Sealed, Delivered (I'm Yours)- Stevie Wonder (1970)
4. Write You A Letter- Ray LaMontagne (2002)
5. Return To Sender- Elvis Presley (1962)
6. Pretty Paper- Willie Nelson (1994 version)
7. Put The Message In The Box- World Party (1990)
8. Tear-Stained Letter- Richard Thompson (1983) 

Info of note:
Intro- "Kiko And The Lavender Moon" by Los Lobos (1992)
Outro- "Pistola Y El Corazon" by Los Lobos (1988)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Sound & Groove, Episode 69: "Left Out Of The Essentials" Part 2

1978 saw Elvis Costello release his sophomore effort but this time with his road band, the Attractions, credited along with him. The result was a pile-driving, snarling, edgy, yet melodic and well-crafted album entitled This Year's Model. It produced a few hit singles but more importantly sprung the unlikely looking rock star to a new level of critical and commercial fame- one that had a few bumps along the way before he found a more settled, mellow period of his career in the mid-80s. The debate raged on about whether he was punk or simply just pub rock or even power pop but Elvis embarked on a career where he tackled just about every genre under the sun and proved himself an intelligent, subversive singer-songwriter along the way that wasn't defined by his earlier, guitar-driven compositions.


This here is the 5th episode of 2016 for the Sound & Groove Podcast and on this one, we explore songs that are usually left out of the lists of essential listening (say that three times fast) for major pop/rock artists. So I'm talking great compositions that only the hardcore fans of these names would rank up there, but ones that the officially record company releases and radio playlists tend to forget about or infrequently use. This will be the 2nd of 2 episodes on this theme, as I collect for you my favourite nuggets or overlooked gems from some big names in contemporary music history over the past half century. 


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centered around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I played edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, each month will containe a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple

https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/cedandelivery85/episodes/2016-11-24T00_15_42-08_00

Track Listing:
1. Mellow- Elton John (1972)
2. It's A New Day, Parts 1 & 2- James Brown (1970)
3. Let It Grow- Eric Clapton (1974)
4. Hand In Hand- Elvis Costello & The Attractions (1978)
5. Jah Is Mighty- Bob Marley & The Wailers (1970)
6. The Folk Singer- Johnny Cash (1968)7. Fireflies- Fleetwood Mac (1980)
8. Share Your Love With Me- The Band (1973)

Info of note:
Intro- "I'm Your Man" by Leonard Cohen (1988)
Outro- "Famous Blue Raincoat" by Leonard Cohen (1971)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Monday, October 3, 2016

Sound & Groove, Episode 68: "Left Out Of The Essentials" Part 1

By 1973, there was no bigger soul star than Al Green. Just when the Memphis-based soul scene looked played out and all but spent as a commercial force as the 70s dawned, Green emerged from a little known record label called Hi Records to revive the sound. With Willie Mitchell as a writing and production guide, a string of smash hit singles and LPs resulted over the next 7 years- though the hot streak wavered by the end with the advent of disco. What set Green apart from others to emerge in R&B/soul at the time was that he could churn out 2 albums a year and still pack great music onto it all with very little filler- a rarity for a soul artist historically. So in other words, while he didn't use the LP as a concept tool like a Stevie Wonder or Marvin Gaye, he didn't skimp on giving essential offerings away from the A and B side of his 45s. Using a less impassioned, savagely excitable approach than the 60s soul greats, Green sang silky, smooth and spiritual, managing to become both a sex symbol and a darling of the music critics in the process. He was praised not only for his versatile voice but for the quality of the songwriting, choice of covers and knack for reinventing the originals as well as how exquisitely arranged the tracks could be- often coming off as romantic yet raw at the same time. The whirlwind life of fame eventually led Green back to his Christian roots and to become an ordained minister, which also led to a decade and a half period (1980-94) where he recorded nothing but gospel and essentially turned his back on stardom. One of his lesser known but nonetheless powerful cuts- taken off 1973's Living For You- can be heard in this S&G episode.


This here is the 4th episode of 2016 for the Sound & Groove Podcast and on this one, we explore songs that are usually left out of the lists of essential listening (say that three times fast) for major pop/rock artists. So I'm talking great compositions that only the hardcore fans of these names would rank up there, but ones that the officially record company releases and radio playlists tend to forget about or infrequently use. This will be the 1st of 2 episodes on this theme, as I collect for you my favourite nuggets or overlooked gems from some big names in contemporary music history over the past half century. 


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or it newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centred around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopsis, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I play edited versions of each tune (to make room for talk and for a good 7-10 songs per 45+ minute episode). And not to worry, each month will contain a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!


Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple

ry/2016-04-06T00_26_39-07_
http://cedandelivery85.podomatic.com/entry/2016-10-03T23_08_49-07_00



Track Listing:
1. It Won't Be Wrong- The Byrds (1965)
2. Washington Bullets- The Clash (1980)
3. Free At Last- Al Green (1973)
4. The Little Things (My Baby Does)- Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band (1978, released 2010)
5. And Your Bird Can Sing- The Beatles (1966)
6. Blue Days, Black Nights- Buddy Holly (1956)
7. If You See Her, Say Hello- Bob Dylan (1975) 
8. You Still Believe In Me- The Beach Boys (1966)
9. The Rain Song- Led Zeppelin (1973) 


Info of note:
Intro- "Off The Wall" by Michael Jackson (1979)
Outro- "Working Day And Night" by Michael Jackson (1979)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Sound & Groove, Episode 67: "It'll Forever Be Royal" Part 2

Chicago Soul/R&B legend Gene Chandler scored his pop breakthrough with "Duke Of Earl" in 1962 and jumped on the opportunity to ride the momentum by donning a cape, top hat and monocle for publicity appearances/photos as well as concerts whenever he performed the signature doo-wop classic. He would keep achieving hits off and on throughout the decade, though none that were the smash "Duke Of Earl" was. Chandler then moved into a production and eventually A&R work in the music industry by the end of the 70s.


This here is the 3rd episode of 2016 for the Sound & Groove Podcast where we explore songs that discuss royalty. That's right, whether it be kings, queens, dukes, duchesses, kingdoms/empires- anything feudal, absolutist and/or medieval; all of it fits the criteria. Could just be the allusion or metaphor the song is built upon or the actual subject matter of the lyrics. This is the 2nd of 2 episodes that collect some of my favourites from a variety of artists. Yep, it was only a matter of time before I got onto the monarchy what with all this hoopla over Prince's death.


But anyway, if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or it newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centred around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopsis, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I play edited versions of each tune (to make room for talk and for a good 7-10 songs per 45+ minute episode). And not to worry, each month will contain a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple
ry/2016-04-06T00_26_39-07_

http://cedandelivery85.podomatic.com/entry/2016-06-14T00_31_21-07_00


Track Listing:
1. Stepping Out Queen- Van Morrison (1979)
2. Wheat Kings- The Tragically Hip (1992)
3. Prince Of Darkness- The Mekons (1987)
4. King Of Ska- Desmond Dekker & The Specials (1993)
5. My Flower Princess- John Lennon (1980)
6. Duke Of Earl- Gene Chandler (1962)
7. The Lamb Ran Away With The Crown- Judee Sill (1971) 
8. Fake Empire- The National (2007)
9. Sir Duke- Stevie Wonder (1976) 


Info of note:
Intro- "It's Gonna Be Lonely" by Prince (1979)
Outro- "Rapsberry Beret" by Prince (1985)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Monday, May 16, 2016

Sound & Groove, Episode 66: "It'll Forever Be Royal" Part 1

Tom Verlaine (born Thomas Miller) was the primary songwriting force behind the short-lived but unforgettable NYC new wave band Television. An inventive, original guitarist in a time of heavy distortion and flashy licks, Verlaine also crafted impressive, poetic lyrics and had a kinship with fellow poet/aspiring singer Patti Smith in the mid-70s, as they even dated at one time. Verlaine struck out on his own from Television in 1979 and crafted a series of low-selling but highly magmatic solo releases. One of his songs makes it into this S&G Podcast episode and was covered a year later by the more high-profile, larger audience David Bowie 


This here is the 2nd episode of 2016 for the Sound & Groove Podcast where we explore songs that discuss royalty. That's right, whether it be kings, queens, dukes, duchesses, kingdoms/empires- anything feudal, absolutist and/or medieval; all of it fits the criteria. Could just be the allusion or metaphor the song is built upon or the actual subject matter of the lyrics. This is the 1st of 2 episodes that collect some of my favourites from a variety of artists. Yep, it was only a matter of time before I got onto the monarchy what with all this hoopla over the death of the great Prince. Then in actual royal news, you've got Prince Harry starting his own competition of games for wounded vets or Queen Elizabeth being annoyed by rude Chinese guests! Timing was right.


But anyway, if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or it newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centred around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopsis, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I play edited versions of each tune (to make room for talk and for a good 7-10 songs per 45+ minute episode). And not to worry, each month will contain a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple
ry/2016-04-06T00_26_39-07_
http://cedandelivery85.podomatic.com/entry/2016-05-16T19_53_31-07_00

Track Listing:
1. Cooksferry Queen- Richard Thompson (1999)
2. King Of The New York Streets- Dion (1989)
3. Eleventh Earl Of Mar- Genesis (1977)
4. Big Chief Got A Golden Crown- The Wild Tchopitoulas (1976)
5. Two Princes- Spin Doctors (1992)
6. Marquesa De Sade- David Johansen (1981)
7. Cardboard Empire- The Guess Who (1973) 
8. Kingdom Come- Tom Verlaine (1979) 

Info of note:
Intro- "Controversy" by Prince (1981)
Outro- "Head" by Prince (1980)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!