Sunday, April 22, 2018

Sound & Groove, Episode 77: "First Name Basis" Part 1


With rough-hewn vocals that could belt out soul and blues, but also provide a soft crooner warmth to handle the ballads, Bobby "Blue" Bland emerged from the thriving Memphis Beale Street blues scene of the early 50s to carve out a career as one of the more influential R&B singers over the next 2 decade. A carer lull as tastes changed toward Philly Soul and funk in the late 60s/early 70s would end when he made a mid-70s comeback to commercial and critical success with a series of fine, blues-influenced releases on ABC records. He eventually settled into the blues revival scene during the 80s and toured those circuits until his death at age 83 in 2013. One of his mid-70s comeback hits is featured on this 1st official S&G Podcast of 2018.

This is the 1st official podcast episode of 2018 here on the Sound & Groove Podcast. It's long overdue but no need to worry, as I've pledged another 5 episodes yet to come throughout this calendar year. This is the 1st in a 2-part theme on songs featuring first names in the title. As in, songs that mention a person's name like Steve or Martha or Rick or Emily (none of which I've actually used! But you get the picture). So check out some of my favourite tracks that fit with the motif I've come up with this time around.


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centred around. It will be jam-packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I play edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, because each month will contain a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all.

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple

Copy and paste this Link: https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/cedandelivery85/episodes/2018-04-22T20_49_20-07_00

Track Listing:
1. Adam's Rib- Melanie Doane (1998)
2. Rosemary- Suzanne Vega (1988)
3. Smokey Joe's Cafe- The Robins (1955)
4. Yolanda- Bobby "Blue" Bland (1974)
5. Oliver James- Fleet Foxes (2008)
6. Three Marlenas- The Wallflowers (1996)
7. The Letter That Johnny Walker Read- Asleep At The Wheel (1973)
8. Romeo & Juliet- Dire Straits (1980)

Info of note:
Intro- "The Good In Everyone" by Sloan (1996)
Outro- "The Other Man" by Sloan (2004)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Sunday, February 11, 2018

Sound & Groove, Episode 76: "Colour My World" Part 2


The Pogues brought a punk energy and sensibility into the traditional Celtic music world after their arrival on the London music scene in the early 80s, unfortunately becoming almost as famous for the drunken exploits of rotten-toothed lead singer Shane MacGowan than for their music. Though this led to his sacking in 1990, the Pogues had a tremendous run with him as the face of the group (writing and singing-wise). Their onstage performances could be sloppy, unhinged and frenetic yet chaotically beautiful like a massive wall of Irish whimsy and spirit in sound. And it actually was some of the most heartfelt, inspired work to come out of the UK in the entire 80s (a decade often marred by style over substance, image over message and gloss over honesty).

This is the 6th official podcast episode of 2017 here on the Sound & Groove Podcast. It's long overdue but no need to worry, as this is the last one owed to all of you great fans out there. This is the 2nd in a 2-part theme on songs that discuss colours in the lyrics or just the title if we want to get looser about it. So check out some of my favourite tracks that fit with this motif I've come up with this time around.


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centred around. It will be jam-packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I play edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, because each month will containe a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening, all.

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple

Copy & past this link: https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/cedandelivery85/episodes/2018-02-11T22_17_53-08_00

Track Listing:
1. Purple Haze- The Jimi Hendrix Experience (1967)
2. Mellow Yellow- Donovan (1966)
3. A Pair Of Brown Eyes- The Pogues (1985)
4. Blackheart Man- Bunny Wailer (1976)
5. Green-Eyed Lady- Sugarloaf (1971)
6. Coat of Many Colours- Dolly Parton (1972)
7. Weasel & The White Boys Cool- Rickie Lee Jones (1979)

Info of note:
Intro- "The Beginning" by Seal (1990)
Outro- "Deep Water" by Seal (1990)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Monday, January 22, 2018

Sound & Groove, Episode 75: "Colour My World" Part 1


The Winstons were a Washington, DC outfit that didn't have a long time in the spotlight as although they had two top 10 hits, they were only separated by a year. The A side of their biggest single, "Color Him Father," is featured here on this first of 2 themed episodes to round out the 2017 compliment (here in early 2018!) on the S&G Podcast. The B-side "Amen Brother" featured a drum break groove that later lived on in infamy as one of the most sampled in the history of hip-hop & electronic music. They may be the most obscure artists on this episode but their hit featured here does live on as a soul classic with a wholesome, heartwarming message in a time of acid, protest and war splitting apart the USA

This is the 5th official podcast episode of 2017 here on the Sound & Groove Podcast. It's long overdue but no need to worry, as this one will be followed up soon enough because it's part 1 of a 2-part theme on songs that discuss colours in the lyrics or just the title if we want to get looser about it. So check out some of my favourite tracks that fit with this motif I've come up with this time around.


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centred around. It will be jam-packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I play edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, because each month will containe a different theme than the last. Got it? Gt it? Good. Happy listening, all.

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple


https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/cedandelivery85/episodes/2018-01-22T22_41_23-08_00

Track Listing:
1. Red Dirt Girl- Emmylou Harris (2000)
2. Touch of Grey- Grateful Dead (1987)
3. Green River- Creedence Clearwater Revival (1969)
4. Blue Moon With Heartache- Rosanne Cash (1980)
5. White Lines (Don't Do It)- Melle Mel (1983)
6. Color Him Father- The Winstons (1969)
7. Black Maria- Todd Rundgren (1972) 

Info of note:
Intro- "High & Dry" by Radiohead (1995)
Outro- "Everything In Its Right Place" by Radiohead (1995)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Friday, December 1, 2017

Sound & Groove, Episode 74: "Good Tunes By Critic Targets" Part 2


Though lauded by prog rock enthusiasts as perhaps the greatest band of the genre, Yes often was derided by most rock critics as a pretentious, overly artsy group. For a while, even the powers that be dismissed them but just this year they were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame after being eligible for 23 years.

This here is the 4th official episode of 2017 for the Sound & Groove Podcast but of course it's way overdue. Don't fret though. Another 2 will still follow here in the rest of 2017. This particular edition is the 2nd of a 2-episode theme dealing with songs I enjoy from artists I typically don't or ones who were often the target of the music critics' revulsion for various reasons.


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centered around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I played edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, each month will contain a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple


https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/cedandelivery85/episodes/2017-11-30T23_53_10-08_00



Track Listing:
1. Massachusetts- The Bee Gees (1967)
2. 25 or 6 to 4- Chicago (1969)
3. Make It With You- Bread (1970)
4. Suite: Judy Blue Eyes- Crosby, Stills & Nash (1969)
5. Roundabout- Yes (1970)

Info of note:
Intro- "Gardening At Night" by R.E.M. (1982)
Outro- "South Central Rain" by R.E.M. (1984)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Sound & Groove, Episode 73: "Good Tunes By Critic Targets" Part 1



Billy Joel struggled in various rock bands and with personal ups and downs of depression but all that hardship led to a solo career that had an early shot-in-the-dark hit "Piano Man" before his 1977 album The Stranger launched him into a superstardom that irked many critics who felt his music was banal, bland, overly extravagant and at times simply schmaltzy as hell. Drawing comparisons to musical figures as far-ranging as Irving Berlin to Elton John or Aaron Copland to Paul McCartney, he drew none of the same respect those others received and even when he tried his damnedest to be serious and "artistic" that only made them resent him more. While his material ain't my cup o' tea, he's got his songs that even I enjoy so he makes it on this S&G Podcast of artists who critics were always hard on- whether they deserved it or not!


This here is the 3rd official episode of 2017 for the Sound & Groove Podcast but of course it's way overdue. Don't fret though. Another 3 will still follow here in the rest of 2017. This particular edition is the first of a 2-episode theme dealing with songs I enjoy from artists I typically don't or ones who were often the target of the music critics' revulsion for various reasons.


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centered around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I played edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, each month will contain a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple


http://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/cedandelivery85/episodes/2017-11-12T22_07_01-08_00


Track Listing:
1. New York State Of Mind- Billy Joel (1976)
2. Solitary Man- Neil Diamond (1967)
3. Knowing Me, Knowing You- ABBA (1976)
4. Anticipation- Carly Simon (1971)
5. Mexico- James Taylor (1975)
6. Sister Golden Hair- America (1975)

Info of note:
Intro- "Contract On The World Love Jam: by Public Enemy (1990)
Outro- "Terminator X Speaks With His Hands" by Public Enemy (1987)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Monday, September 4, 2017

Sound & Groove, Episode 72: "Songs Of The Celestial" Part 2



Oklahoma guitar hero J.J. Cale had a long career as a session man and recording engineer before launching a low-key but cult-like followed solo career in his early 30s. A master at melding bluegrass, country, blues and folk into a murky, swampy, unique presentation that became part of the "Tulsa Sound," Cale had many of his signature tracks covered by high-profile names such as Lynyrd Skynyrd ("Call Me The Breeze"), Captain Beefheart ("Same Old Blues") and Eric Clapton ("After Midnight," "Cocaine," several others)- the one who extolled Cale's virtues like no other, crediting him with a change in his approach in the mid-70s and even collaborating with him on an album in 2006. Cale continued to make interesting work up until his 2013 death and is featured on this 2nd podcast of 2017 for S&G.


This here is the 2nd official episode of 2017 for the Sound & Groove Podcast but of course it's way overdue. Don't fret though. Another 4 will still follow here in the rest of 2017. This particular edition is the second of a 2-episode theme with songs of the celestial- ie dealing with or alluding to outer space and all the various orbital/flying objects found in it. How fitting considering the recent solar eclipse to cross the planet.


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centered around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I played edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, each month will contain a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple

Track Listing:
1. Cajun Moon- J.J. Cale (1974)
2. Sun It Rises- Fleet Foxes (2008)
3. A Handful Of Stars/Stars Fell On Alabama- Mel Torme & Rob McConnell (1987)
4. Concerning The UFO Sighting Near Highland, Illinois- Sufjan Stevens (2005)
5. Satellite- Elvis Costello (1989)
6. Walking On The Moon- The Police (1979)
7. Planet Rock- Afrika Bambaataa & Soul Sonic Force (1982)
8. The Space Invader- The Pretenders (1980)


Info of note:
Intro- "Just Like A Woman" by Nina Simone (1971)
Outro- "My Baby Just Cares For Me" by Nina Simone (1958)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!

Friday, August 4, 2017

Sound & Groove, Episode 71: "Songs of the Celestial" Part 1


Between 1969 and 1972, English folk musician Nick Drake only issued three, low-key, mainly acoustically performed albums on the UK label Island Records. He was 20 when the 1st (Five Leaves Left) was recorded and just 23 when the final one (Pink Moon, a followup to the middle companion, 1971's Bryter Later) was issued. However in subsequent years, more popular artists championed his unique, jazz-inflected but folk-based music and critics began to come around to praising an artist that had gone virtually unnoticed in his brief recording career- one marred by poor promotion, a reluctance to perform live and constant battles with depression that eventually led to him fading from the spotlight, albeit a dim one, after 1972. Drake never returned to his music, as a prescription drug overdose in 1974 ended his life (labeled suicide by the coroner and several others, though that verdict has been disputed ever since). Another piece of proof that unknowns in their era may come to prominence as a celebrated cult artist years later, Drake is included among the 8 songs including on this particular S&G Podcast episode.


This here is the 1st official episode of 2017 for the Sound & Groove Podcast but of course it's way overdue. Don't fret though. Another 5 will still follow here in the rest of 2017. This particular edition is the first of a 2-episode theme with songs of the celestial- ie dealing with or alluding to outer space and all the various orbital/flying objects found in it. 


And if you haven't been keeping up with S&G on Music of Evan's Mind and/or its newest home at www.notthepublicbroadcaster.com, here's the breakdown: Every month there will be a theme that the selection of music is centered around. It will be jam packed with my analysis, synopses, anecdotes and other witticisms you might enjoy while I played edited-down versions of each tune. And not to worry, each month will containe a different theme than the last. Got it? Get it? Good. Happy listening to you all!

https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/cedandelivery85/episodes/2017-08-04T07_32_56-07_00

Follow me on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/Edowrimple

Track Listing:
1. What A Little Moonlight Can Do- Billie Holiday (1935)
2. Saturday Sun- Nick Drake (1969)
3. Galaxy- War (1977)
4. Stella By Starlight- Tony Bennett (1962)
5. Spaceship- Kanye West (2004)
6. Yellow Moon- Neville Brothers (1989)
7. Planet Telex- Radiohead (1995)
8. Unfunky UFO- Parliament (1975) 

Info of note:
Intro- "Fire And Brimstone" by The Neville Brothers (1989)
Outro- "Brother Jake" by The Neville Brothers (1990)
All comments, questions and feedback are greatly welcomed and appreciated! I encourage participation. Even though I drain an hour off your life by listening to the podcast then checking through the links, at least you don't have to fork over your money to me... though if you feel like, you know... But in all seriousness, let me now what you'd like to hear or see and I'll consider it. Popular approval doesn't always sway me but having fans or listeners get their input would be just grand!